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The Brontes' Piano
The Brontes' Piano
March 14 2012

Singer Catherine Bott explores the Bronte sisters' musical world through their newly restored piano, now returned to the parsonage in Haworth. Joined by pianist Jonathan Cohen, Catherine looks through the Bronte's family music collection and discovers how musical life at the parsonage underscored the sisters' creative life, their work and tastes.

The Sleep Diaries
The Sleep Diaries
October 24 2011

Sleep is our shadow life: if it were a place we'd spend about a third of our life there. We are as varied and eccentric in sleep as we are in our waking lives. And we still understand very little about why we sleep, how it works and what sleep and dreams actually mean. In this series mixing science with art, myth and poetry, award winning poet and broadcaster Paul Farley goes on the long journey through a night's sleep.

The Day Before 9/11
The Day Before 9/11
September 11 2011

How do you read the day before the day the world changed?

The Politics of Dancing
The Politics of Dancing
June 27 2011

Disco is one of the most maligned and misunderstood of musical genres, thought to be musically vapid, hedonistic and frivolous. Far from it. Disco was utopian and subversive, and political to its core. Born in New York's deepest underground, it brought together strands of gay liberation and post Civil-Rights racial integration. Disco put into practice what the Sixties preached. This feature uncovers the politics of the disco movement, beginning in the lofts of New York and culminating in a racially charged backlash and the mass burning of disco records in football stadiums across America.

Into the Music Library
Into the Music Library
April 08 2011

It's the music which has surrounded us our whole lives, but which most of us have never quite heard let alone listened to. Sometimes called 'Source music', 'Mood Music' or as it's best known, 'Library music': a hugely important part of British sonic history.

Nazi Gold! Publishing the Third Reich
Nazi Gold! Publishing the Third Reich
March 10 2011

Why are books about the Third Reich such an ongoing publishing phenomenon in the UK…. and what does it say about us?

The Way Out: The Disabled Avant-Garde
The Way Out: The Disabled Avant-Garde
March 10 2011

Can art and irony achieve what mainstream politics never has and give the disability movement its own revolution?

Listen to the Word!
Listen to the Word!
December 17 2010

It’s as modern as Marconi, as global as Coca-Cola and as troubling to authority as Marxism once was. Pentecostalism is a religion beating modernity at its own game. It was invented at the beginning of the twentieth century and is the very model of a modern Christianity, disturbing not only to hard line atheists but even to the Catholic Church and the Chinese Communist Party. Nearly one quarter of the 2 billion Christians in the world are now Pentecostals (and counting). This feature explores just what it is that’s made Pentecostalism the fastest growing form of today's Christianity.

The Electric Poly-Olbion
The Electric Poly-Olbion
October 28 2010

Part poetry and part national topographical survey, The Electric Poly-Olbion will be poet and broadcaster Paul Farley's reimagining of Michael Drayton's extraordinary ‘Poly-Olbion’, first published in 1612.

Foreign Bodies
Foreign Bodies
September 28 2010

Foreign students are big business for Britain and its universities. They help to make our cities cosmopolitan. When they return home they provide an invaluable network into their countries for British businesses. And last but not least, they contribute billions not only to UK Higher Education but to the wider UK economy. Without them British universities could not survive financially. So if we can’t do without such students, and since we want them for all kinds of reasons, we must be treating them as honoured guests, mustn’t we? Well no…not really.